|all article|Activation|brand|cheap polo|items|Jerseys|Lacoste|Mall|outlet|Product|Professional|Ralph Lauren|Shopping|swiss watch|twitter|watch|windows| login
|not set\Activation\Cheap Red Bottom Shoes

Cheap Red Bottom Shoes

auther: date:2013-07-06
sources:http://www.irishharpschool.com/2004/

Compass Online At the end of January,Cheap Red Bottom Shoes I received a postgraduate travel grant to go to Sweden on a research and field trip. I had carefully chosen the time, hoping to plough through snow in the pine forests in a similar fashion to the protagonist Christina in the fictional component of my thesis. Christina's Going Away is set in Sweden in the 1930s and 60s, evoking the time of my childhood and that of my parents, and I needed to do some research on setting and place, both the small town where the novel is set, but also the setting in a wider context of the political and historical framework. Just like my protagonist, I spent the weekends walking in my past with my sister. We walked through the cemetery and the pine forests surrounding the small town of Anderstorp, where I grew up in the south of Sweden; through the tiny village Törås where my mother grew up on top of the hill; past the local museum where my grandfather started his industry at the edge of the forest; around the small lake surrounded by boglands where a bear, lost far too south for its own good, was shot a few years ago. In the eerie silence, my feet soaking wet, all I could see were barren trees sticking up through the gloomy bog. I trod carefully, my sister a colourful figure ahead of me on the narrow boardwalk - my sister, who not only carries a thermos with hot coffee in her knapsack at all times, but also a wealth of local knowledge, turned around and told me that this was where our father used to herd cows when he was little. I imagined how frightened he must have been (or maybe he was excited? ), an eight year old in the ghostlike bog all by himself. On an unforgettable afternoon we met up with my father's ninety-three-year old neighbour and friend in the tiny village of Tyngel, who tearfully remembered the moment my grandfather had had to sell his farm and leave the village due to the depression. I have always been fascinated by the strength of my father's emotion over this experience, and his reluctance to return to this memory. I learnt a lot this afternoon. Those defining moments in one's personal history and the repercussions and influence for the generations to come interests me, and researching this aspect will form part of my exegesis. However most of my time is spent at the news archives of the local newspaper which, luckily for me, has records saved from 1930. Time and events of both national and international significance, but also the small, local events and dramas which affect us equally, were developed and played out as I turned the pages. There was the emerging power of Hitler side by side with the announcement of my grandfather's death and my father's childhood farm being auctioned. In the newspapers from the 60s and 70s I returned to the strangely familiar territory of my own childhood. There was even the odd photograph of myself in the paper, dancing around a Christmas tree in the local church or singing in the choir, my face glowing in almost unbearable eagerness. The papers reminded me of the TV programs I loved, the clothes I wore, and the events that were discussed. Reading the articles, I could look at them from a critical distance and yet often remember in detail how I experienced them at the time. I could have spent months in the archives, but time constraints applied, and the last week of my stay I headed for Stockholm. One of the highlights was hearing my aunt on my mother's side bringing her past to life, recalling when the grandfather I never met died of tuberculosis when she was a child. Returning to my creative writing, it is the small details of her childhood that I will remember: people queuing up to have a look at the first bathroom in the village and try out the bathtub in my mother family's fancy new home; or the birthday party no one came to, the neighbours' children being too scared of being infected by my grandfather. My aunt generously told me not only of her past but also endured my never-ending questions about the times, such as whether it was common to have a car, telephone, or radio when she grew up (no, it was not); invaluable details and knowledge which is rapidly disappearing with each generation. I also spent considerable hours at the August Strindberg museum going through archives with a particular interest in documents about his faith and religion - a strong theme in my thesis. At the Olof Palme archives, I spent a fascinating time reading articles on perhaps the most influential politician in Sweden's history- thus quite similar, in fact, to the equally controversial literary giant of Strindberg almost 100 hundred years earlier. Armed with invaluable insight about both my family's past and that of Sweden, I returned to Melbourne- severely jetlagged - to summer heat and the new challenge of tutoring - the day after landing. I feel grateful for the travel grant allowing me this trip, but also humbled by the generosity and interest I received about my project in Sweden. The only disappointment was really the weather! Instead of snow creaking beneath my feet, it is the memory of the darkness of the season and, apart from one day of soft snow falling, the sound of rain which is all prevailing. Global warming seemingly turning even the weather of my past into a distant memory. 

not set
res://mshtml.dll/about.moz
this article reads 715 times
@ hotarticle

@ relearticle


copyrightall:not set time: 47 ms